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Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
The story of Gerston whisky is a tale of two distilleries, known as Gerston One and Gerston Two. Gerston One was a family-owned farm- house scale distillery, with a typically small output, making high quality spirit that was in demand both at home and further afield. It was enjoyed by the great and good of London society and had customers as far apart as Brazil and India. It existed for over eighty years, and remained in the Swanson family for nearly all of that time.Gerston Two was an industrial scale distillery with a capacity of 80,000 gallons of spirit per year. The owners hoped to emulate the success of the whisky from Gerston One by building a new distillery, which had a capacity almost ten times the size of Gerston One. When it was opened in 1886 it was arguably the most innovative and modern distillery in Scotland, and certainly the largest distillery in Caithness. Its design utilised a natural fall in the land, which allowed gravity to govern the process and the movement of liquids. Production at Gerston Two lasted for little over two decades - they were unable to replicate the success and, importantly, quality of spirit previously associated with the Gerston name.The Gerston distilleries were located in Halkirk in Caithness - a remote area in the far north of Scotland. The economy in this part of Scotland is primarily farming and fishing based, although large parts of the region are comprised of rocks and bog, and unsuitable for cultivating or tending animals. It was, however, ideal territory for hiding and operating unlicensed stills. Excise returns for 1826 show at least 17 licensed distilleries in the area, with the Caithness Courier reporting over 200 convictions for unlicensed distillation in the county that year!Gerston One was founded by Francis Swanson in 1796. Swanson ran the distillery until 1825 before handing the business to his son James, who remained the owner until the distillery was sold in 1872. The distillery was closed in 1875 and demolished in 1882.Gerston Two was built in 1886, approximately a mile from the site of Gerston One and close to the newly opened train station at Halkirk. The owners of Gerston Two were a London-based consortium - The Gerston Distillery Company. Production lasted only 11 years before it was sold to Northern Distilleries Limited, who changed the distillery name to Ben Morven. Distilling at the re-named Ben Morven continued for only another three years before ceasing in 1900. There is evidence of sporadic production thereafter, until the site was officially declared closed in 1911 and demolition commenced around 1914.The water source for Gerston One was an unnamed stream next to Gerston farm. The water ran from a nearby well before emptying into the Calder Burn. Maps from the era show the well, and the collection pool, thus indicating that Gerston One had concerns over water supply. Local water is exceptionally pure, with unusually high salinity. This would add a salty edge to the spirit, neatly accompanying the strong peat reek of Gerston One whisky.When Alfred Barnard visited Gerston Two in 1887 he was informed that they had exclusive rights to the same water source. However due to the distance between the two sites, we believe this is highly improbable. Gerston Two most likely used the nearby Calder Burn, which is a tributary of the Thurso River. A separate channel was built outside the distillery, which allowed water to flow through the complex for cooling and mashing. Cooling water was later returned to the burn beyond the distillery.Gerston One used local peat from nearby Loch Calder. Peats cut in this area are distinctly briny and salty. Although it is several miles from the coast, geological evidence suggests retreating glaciers from the last ice age deposited large quantities of beach debris in the area, thus adding to the medicinal composition of the peat. There is no evidence that Gerston Two used peat at all. When Alfred Barnard visited in 1887, he noted that t
$58 Go to
Laurenti Wines
Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
The story of Gerston whisky is a tale of two distilleries, known as Gerston One and Gerston Two. Gerston One was a family-owned farm- house scale distillery, with a typically small output, making high quality spirit that was in demand both at home and further afield. It was enjoyed by the great and good of London society and had customers as far apart as Brazil and India. It existed for over eighty years, and remained in the Swanson family for nearly all of that time.Gerston Two was an industrial scale distillery with a capacity of 80,000 gallons of spirit per year. The owners hoped to emulate the success of the whisky from Gerston One by building a new distillery, which had a capacity almost ten times the size of Gerston One. When it was opened in 1886 it was arguably the most innovative and modern distillery in Scotland, and certainly the largest distillery in Caithness. Its design utilised a natural fall in the land, which allowed gravity to govern the process and the movement of liquids. Production at Gerston Two lasted for little over two decades - they were unable to replicate the success and, importantly, quality of spirit previously associated with the Gerston name.The Gerston distilleries were located in Halkirk in Caithness - a remote area in the far north of Scotland. The economy in this part of Scotland is primarily farming and fishing based, although large parts of the region are comprised of rocks and bog, and unsuitable for cultivating or tending animals. It was, however, ideal territory for hiding and operating unlicensed stills. Excise returns for 1826 show at least 17 licensed distilleries in the area, with the Caithness Courier reporting over 200 convictions for unlicensed distillation in the county that year!Gerston One was founded by Francis Swanson in 1796. Swanson ran the distillery until 1825 before handing the business to his son James, who remained the owner until the distillery was sold in 1872. The distillery was closed in 1875 and demolished in 1882.Gerston Two was built in 1886, approximately a mile from the site of Gerston One and close to the newly opened train station at Halkirk. The owners of Gerston Two were a London-based consortium - The Gerston Distillery Company. Production lasted only 11 years before it was sold to Northern Distilleries Limited, who changed the distillery name to Ben Morven. Distilling at the re-named Ben Morven continued for only another three years before ceasing in 1900. There is evidence of sporadic production thereafter, until the site was officially declared closed in 1911 and demolition commenced around 1914.The water source for Gerston One was an unnamed stream next to Gerston farm. The water ran from a nearby well before emptying into the Calder Burn. Maps from the era show the well, and the collection pool, thus indicating that Gerston One had concerns over water supply. Local water is exceptionally pure, with unusually high salinity. This would add a salty edge to the spirit, neatly accompanying the strong peat reek of Gerston One whisky.When Alfred Barnard visited Gerston Two in 1887 he was informed that they had exclusive rights to the same water source. However due to the distance between the two sites, we believe this is highly improbable. Gerston Two most likely used the nearby Calder Burn, which is a tributary of the Thurso River. A separate channel was built outside the distillery, which allowed water to flow through the complex for cooling and mashing. Cooling water was later returned to the burn beyond the distillery.Gerston One used local peat from nearby Loch Calder. Peats cut in this area are distinctly briny and salty. Although it is several miles from the coast, geological evidence suggests retreating glaciers from the last ice age deposited large quantities of beach debris in the area, thus adding to the medicinal composition of the peat. There is no evidence that Gerston Two used peat at all. When Alfred Barnard visited in 1887, he noted that t
$66 Go to
International Wine Shop
Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Gerston 750ml
The story of Gerston whisky is a tale of two distilleries, known as Gerston One and Gerston Two. Gerston One was a family-owned farm- house scale distillery, with a typically small output, making high quality spirit that was in demand both at home and further afield. It was enjoyed by the great and good of London society and had customers as far apart as Brazil and India. It existed for over eighty years, and remained in the Swanson family for nearly all of that time.Gerston Two was an industrial scale distillery with a capacity of 80,000 gallons of spirit per year. The owners hoped to emulate the success of the whisky from Gerston One by building a new distillery, which had a capacity almost ten times the size of Gerston One. When it was opened in 1886 it was arguably the most innovative and modern distillery in Scotland, and certainly the largest distillery in Caithness. Its design utilised a natural fall in the land, which allowed gravity to govern the process and the movement of liquids. Production at Gerston Two lasted for little over two decades - they were unable to replicate the success and, importantly, quality of spirit previously associated with the Gerston name.The Gerston distilleries were located in Halkirk in Caithness - a remote area in the far north of Scotland. The economy in this part of Scotland is primarily farming and fishing based, although large parts of the region are comprised of rocks and bog, and unsuitable for cultivating or tending animals. It was, however, ideal territory for hiding and operating unlicensed stills. Excise returns for 1826 show at least 17 licensed distilleries in the area, with the Caithness Courier reporting over 200 convictions for unlicensed distillation in the county that year!Gerston One was founded by Francis Swanson in 1796. Swanson ran the distillery until 1825 before handing the business to his son James, who remained the owner until the distillery was sold in 1872. The distillery was closed in 1875 and demolished in 1882.Gerston Two was built in 1886, approximately a mile from the site of Gerston One and close to the newly opened train station at Halkirk. The owners of Gerston Two were a London-based consortium - The Gerston Distillery Company. Production lasted only 11 years before it was sold to Northern Distilleries Limited, who changed the distillery name to Ben Morven. Distilling at the re-named Ben Morven continued for only another three years before ceasing in 1900. There is evidence of sporadic production thereafter, until the site was officially declared closed in 1911 and demolition commenced around 1914.The water source for Gerston One was an unnamed stream next to Gerston farm. The water ran from a nearby well before emptying into the Calder Burn. Maps from the era show the well, and the collection pool, thus indicating that Gerston One had concerns over water supply. Local water is exceptionally pure, with unusually high salinity. This would add a salty edge to the spirit, neatly accompanying the strong peat reek of Gerston One whisky.When Alfred Barnard visited Gerston Two in 1887 he was informed that they had exclusive rights to the same water source. However due to the distance between the two sites, we believe this is highly improbable. Gerston Two most likely used the nearby Calder Burn, which is a tributary of the Thurso River. A separate channel was built outside the distillery, which allowed water to flow through the complex for cooling and mashing. Cooling water was later returned to the burn beyond the distillery.Gerston One used local peat from nearby Loch Calder. Peats cut in this area are distinctly briny and salty. Although it is several miles from the coast, geological evidence suggests retreating glaciers from the last ice age deposited large quantities of beach debris in the area, thus adding to the medicinal composition of the peat. There is no evidence that Gerston Two used peat at all. When Alfred Barnard visited in 1887, he noted that t
$60 Go to
Shop Rite Wines & Spirits
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
A true legend, Auchnagie is the first release from The Lost Distillery Company. Auchnagie was situated in the hamlet of Tulliemet near Ballinluig in Perthshire and was also known as Tulliemet distillery at one point in its existence. It takes its name from the Gaelic, Achadh na Gaoidhe meaning ‘the wind of the fields'.First built around 1812, Auchnagie was situated in an area of Scotland that was home to many farm distilleries. All of these have now been lost to the world with the notable exceptions of Glenturret and Edradour. Glenturret is now the home of The Famous Grouse and, as such, has come a long way from its humble beginnings.Auchnagie had a varied and somewhat unstable existence. In its 100 years of distilling it had no fewer than seven owners, from the founder James Duff to its final owner John Dewar & Sons, Auchnagie was owned by Peter Dawson when it received a visit from the great whisky explorer, Alfred Barnard. The distillery was not distilling during Barnard's stay and he recorded his visit as follows:The whole of this beautiful Strath Tay is one continued scene of the beauty of nature in its simplest, widest, and most imposing richness and stillmess of the whole; the fragrant birches, graceful hazels, rolling hills of the greenest verdure, and background of mountains all form some of the richest pictures on which the eye could wish to gaze. At the time of our visit to Auchnagie Distillery the works had ceased operation, as the weather was too hot for malting. The distillery consists of a barley loft, malting still, and mash house, and a few other buildings, including spirit stores and warehouse accommodation for 40,000 gallons. The water used comes from the Auchnagie hills, and the make is Highland malt. Only peats brought from Loch Broom are used in drying the malt. One exciseman is employed at the distillery who informed us that he leads quite a pastoral life here, and spends his summer days in his garden and little farmyard.In 1912, Auchnagie distillery was dismantled and lost to the world. Liquor Scotch Whisky
$58 Go to
Laurenti Wines
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie Vintage 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie Vintage 750ml
A true legend, Auchnagie is the first release from The Lost Distillery Company. Auchnagie was situated in the hamlet of Tulliemet near Ballinluig in Perthshire and was also known as Tulliemet distillery at one point in its existence. It takes its name from the Gaelic, Achadh na Gaoidhe meaning ‘the wind of the fields'.First built around 1812, Auchnagie was situated in an area of Scotland that was home to many farm distilleries. All of these have now been lost to the world with the notable exceptions of Glenturret and Edradour. Glenturret is now the home of The Famous Grouse and, as such, has come a long way from its humble beginnings.Auchnagie had a varied and somewhat unstable existence. In its 100 years of distilling it had no fewer than seven owners, from the founder James Duff to its final owner John Dewar & Sons, Auchnagie was owned by Peter Dawson when it received a visit from the great whisky explorer, Alfred Barnard. The distillery was not distilling during Barnard's stay and he recorded his visit as follows:The whole of this beautiful Strath Tay is one continued scene of the beauty of nature in its simplest, widest, and most imposing richness and stillmess of the whole; the fragrant birches, graceful hazels, rolling hills of the greenest verdure, and background of mountains all form some of the richest pictures on which the eye could wish to gaze. At the time of our visit to Auchnagie Distillery the works had ceased operation, as the weather was too hot for malting. The distillery consists of a barley loft, malting still, and mash house, and a few other buildings, including spirit stores and warehouse accommodation for 40,000 gallons. The water used comes from the Auchnagie hills, and the make is Highland malt. Only peats brought from Loch Broom are used in drying the malt. One exciseman is employed at the distillery who informed us that he leads quite a pastoral life here, and spends his summer days in his garden and little farmyard.In 1912, Auchnagie distillery was dismantled and lost to the world. Liquor Scotch Whisky
$216 Go to
Laurenti Wines
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
A true legend, Auchnagie is the first release from The Lost Distillery Company. Auchnagie was situated in the hamlet of Tulliemet near Ballinluig in Perthshire and was also known as Tulliemet distillery at one point in its existence. It takes its name from the Gaelic, Achadh na Gaoidhe meaning ‘the wind of the fields'.First built around 1812, Auchnagie was situated in an area of Scotland that was home to many farm distilleries. All of these have now been lost to the world with the notable exceptions of Glenturret and Edradour. Glenturret is now the home of The Famous Grouse and, as such, has come a long way from its humble beginnings.Auchnagie had a varied and somewhat unstable existence. In its 100 years of distilling it had no fewer than seven owners, from the founder James Duff to its final owner John Dewar & Sons, Auchnagie was owned by Peter Dawson when it received a visit from the great whisky explorer, Alfred Barnard. The distillery was not distilling during Barnard's stay and he recorded his visit as follows:The whole of this beautiful Strath Tay is one continued scene of the beauty of nature in its simplest, widest, and most imposing richness and stillmess of the whole; the fragrant birches, graceful hazels, rolling hills of the greenest verdure, and background of mountains all form some of the richest pictures on which the eye could wish to gaze. At the time of our visit to Auchnagie Distillery the works had ceased operation, as the weather was too hot for malting. The distillery consists of a barley loft, malting still, and mash house, and a few other buildings, including spirit stores and warehouse accommodation for 40,000 gallons. The water used comes from the Auchnagie hills, and the make is Highland malt. Only peats brought from Loch Broom are used in drying the malt. One exciseman is employed at the distillery who informed us that he leads quite a pastoral life here, and spends his summer days in his garden and little farmyard.In 1912, Auchnagie distillery was dismantled and lost to the world. Liquor Scotch Whisky
$65 Go to
International Wine Shop
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie 750ml
A true legend, Auchnagie is the first release from The Lost Distillery Company. Auchnagie was situated in the hamlet of Tulliemet near Ballinluig in Perthshire and was also known as Tulliemet distillery at one point in its existence. It takes its name from the Gaelic, Achadh na Gaoidhe meaning ‘the wind of the fields'.First built around 1812, Auchnagie was situated in an area of Scotland that was home to many farm distilleries. All of these have now been lost to the world with the notable exceptions of Glenturret and Edradour. Glenturret is now the home of The Famous Grouse and, as such, has come a long way from its humble beginnings.Auchnagie had a varied and somewhat unstable existence. In its 100 years of distilling it had no fewer than seven owners, from the founder James Duff to its final owner John Dewar & Sons, Auchnagie was owned by Peter Dawson when it received a visit from the great whisky explorer, Alfred Barnard. The distillery was not distilling during Barnard's stay and he recorded his visit as follows:The whole of this beautiful Strath Tay is one continued scene of the beauty of nature in its simplest, widest, and most imposing richness and stillmess of the whole; the fragrant birches, graceful hazels, rolling hills of the greenest verdure, and background of mountains all form some of the richest pictures on which the eye could wish to gaze. At the time of our visit to Auchnagie Distillery the works had ceased operation, as the weather was too hot for malting. The distillery consists of a barley loft, malting still, and mash house, and a few other buildings, including spirit stores and warehouse accommodation for 40,000 gallons. The water used comes from the Auchnagie hills, and the make is Highland malt. Only peats brought from Loch Broom are used in drying the malt. One exciseman is employed at the distillery who informed us that he leads quite a pastoral life here, and spends his summer days in his garden and little farmyard.In 1912, Auchnagie distillery was dismantled and lost to the world. Liquor Scotch Whisky
$60 Go to
Shop Rite Wines & Spirits
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie Vintage 750ml
Lost Distillery Scotch Auchnagie Vintage 750ml
A true legend, Auchnagie is the first release from The Lost Distillery Company. Auchnagie was situated in the hamlet of Tulliemet near Ballinluig in Perthshire and was also known as Tulliemet distillery at one point in its existence. It takes its name from the Gaelic, Achadh na Gaoidhe meaning ‘the wind of the fields'.First built around 1812, Auchnagie was situated in an area of Scotland that was home to many farm distilleries. All of these have now been lost to the world with the notable exceptions of Glenturret and Edradour. Glenturret is now the home of The Famous Grouse and, as such, has come a long way from its humble beginnings.Auchnagie had a varied and somewhat unstable existence. In its 100 years of distilling it had no fewer than seven owners, from the founder James Duff to its final owner John Dewar & Sons, Auchnagie was owned by Peter Dawson when it received a visit from the great whisky explorer, Alfred Barnard. The distillery was not distilling during Barnard's stay and he recorded his visit as follows:The whole of this beautiful Strath Tay is one continued scene of the beauty of nature in its simplest, widest, and most imposing richness and stillmess of the whole; the fragrant birches, graceful hazels, rolling hills of the greenest verdure, and background of mountains all form some of the richest pictures on which the eye could wish to gaze. At the time of our visit to Auchnagie Distillery the works had ceased operation, as the weather was too hot for malting. The distillery consists of a barley loft, malting still, and mash house, and a few other buildings, including spirit stores and warehouse accommodation for 40,000 gallons. The water used comes from the Auchnagie hills, and the make is Highland malt. Only peats brought from Loch Broom are used in drying the malt. One exciseman is employed at the distillery who informed us that he leads quite a pastoral life here, and spends his summer days in his garden and little farmyard.In 1912, Auchnagie distillery was dismantled and lost to the world. Liquor Scotch Whisky
$224 Go to
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