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The sram og 1090 11 23 10 speed cassette black is sold out or discontinued. We found 1500 related products.

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When SRAM re-introduced Red in 2012, there was nothing more its engineers could do to make it better. It had been redesigned throughout, targeting specific areas of the drivetrain at the requests of the world's best cyclists. SRAM concluded that adding more gearing to the equation was the only conceivable improvement required. So once again its engineers began refining their marquee groupset. The result is that now, without adding any weight, SRAM delivers the new iteration of Red with 22 gears. While other manufacturers would call this an 11-speed groupset, SRAM calls the system 'True 22,' as twenty-two is the numeric expression of exactly how many useable, trim-free gears you receive. With True 22 you're able to utilize every gear, in any combination, even when cross-chaining. For the new Red 22 Shifters, SRAM carried over the ErgoFit bodies and internals of its Red Ergo Dynamic Shifters, with the exception of them now being built with an 11th indent. In designing the Red Ergo Dynamic Shifters, SRAM focused its research and development on perfecting their shape, texture, and materials. SRAM retained the internals of the first-generation Red DoubleTap levers, and brought laser-like focus to ergonomics. The new ErgoFit bodies are somewhat smaller in diameter when compared side-to-side with the original Red. This improves grip and finger wrap by allowing more room under the hood for a control- and comfort-boosting connection. The new shape offers a smooth transition from bar to hood and SRAM covered it with lightly padded, textured rubber to thwart fatigue and enhance grip. They also reshaped the hoods, increasing the size of the bulge up top for increased leverage and comfort when you're stretched out, putting extra pressure on the hoods. Because the internals carry over, or have been slightly modified to fit the new body, the Red 22 levers retain the crisp movement between gears SRAM mastered with the first-generation Red. The key to this is SRAM's ZeroLoss a...
$370 Go to
Competitive Cyclist
SRAM now delivers 22 gears with its new Force groupset. It's called 'True 22,' as the 11-speed drivetrain allows you to utilize every one of these gears, in any combination, without adding any weight to the already outstanding Force drivetrain system. The Force 22 Rear Derailleur stands in as an integral component of the new groupset, calibrated for 11 speeds using the same innovative technologies that have made its Red group an industry leader when it comes to exact, predictable shifting under the world's most demanding riding conditions. When SRAM first introduced its groundbreaking 10-speed Red component group, the heart of the design was 1:1 Exact Actuation technology. This means that with each shift the derailleur pulls the same exact length of cable, regardless of what gear you're in. 1:1 is simple to set up, it stays in adjustment longer, and it provides laser-accurate shifting. This advancement sent competitors scrambling to one-up SRAM. Its engineers didn't buy the hype, and instead they put massive efforts into improving their 10-speed drivetrain. The result is that the new Force 22 Rear Derailleur benefits more directly from the lessons learned over the life of Red than if SRAM were to start from scratch. Today, they've built from that 10-speed foundation, bumping the number of gears to 11. For us, in addition to the added gearing, we receive even tighter shifts than before as we now have smaller gaps between cogs. SRAM's new Force 22 Rear Derailleur now incorporates a longer upper knuckle than the previous version, which easily clears 28-tooth cogs without issue. It's made of incredibly stiff forged aluminum to resist flex, which helps to maintain perfect gear alignment. The inner carbon/aluminum pulley cage was also revamped to resist flex, increasing rigidity for precise gear changes. The pulleys of the Force 22 Rear Derailleur were the main focus for SRAM engineers during the development of the new group, which now adopt the once-Red-exclusive A...
$85 Go to
Backcountry.com
SRAM is always pushing the boundaries of what components can do. Whether it be lightweight cassettes or burly chains, SRAM makes components that are made to be dragged through the mud and come out ready to do it again the next day. Continuing this spirit of innovation is SRAM's new XX1 group. With 11-speeds, the group works flawlessly for all disciplines of mountain biking, with the most indispensable feature being the XX1 X-DOME Cassette. At first, the cassette body might have you puzzled. Where's the lockring? In order to make room for the 11th sprocket, SRAM eliminated the lockring in favor of its XD driver body. With the cassette threading at the base of the freehub body, it creates a stabler connection between the hub and the cassette. And by using the same installation tool that SRAM has relied on for years, this seemingly complicated cassette is actually easier to maintenance than any 10-speed. Though you may find yourself marveling at the XX1 design, its engagement and mud clearance outshines its looks. The single-unit X-DOME body provides the massive, 10-42t gear range an evenly spaced orientation for precise and consistent shifting efforts -- not to mention an ample range of gears to conquer any terrain. It's important to note that the XX1 cassette requires the use of a distinct freehub body. However, on a bright note, SRAM estimates that its new XD driver body is around six to eight grams lighter than a standard freehub body. For now, the XD driver body is available from three sources -- SRAM, Mavic, and DT Swiss, so you still have top-tier options for a new, XX1-compatible wheelset. The SRAM XX1 X-DOME Cassette is available in a 10-42 range and is only compatible with the SRAM XD driver body. Manufacturers currently offering freehubs compatible with the XD driver body include SRAM, DT Swiss, and Industry 9.
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Backcountry.com
The SRAM X0 Type 2 Rear Derailleur is the highest-end offering from SRAM to get the Type 2 treatment. It's worth looking at if you have trouble with dropped chains, but a roller-style chainguide doesn't fit with your light-and-efficient setup. SRAM incorporated a clutch mechanism into its Type 2 derailleurs to control chain tension and stabilize the rear derailleur cage; this limits chain slap and keeps the chain from derailing on technical trails. Shimano's Shadow Plus design, which is engineered to produce a similar chain-stabilizing effect, preceded SRAM's Type 2 design in reaching the marketplace. However, Type 2 technology differs from its competition in a key way. Rather than opting for an adjustable friction band, SRAM put a Roller Bearing Clutch in their Type 2 derailleurs. The clutch comes pre-set from the factory to provide a certain amount of friction inside the derailleur cage pivot. This friction keeps the cage from bouncing up and down over rocky trails and de-tensioning the chain. Because it's pre-set at the factory, SRAM's Type 2 clutch can't be disengaged or adjusted like Shimano's Shadow Plus mechanism. That being said, the Type 2 clutch is self-lubricating, and there are no external moving parts, so unlike the Shadow Plus system, it's designed to be maintenance-free. The Type 2 mechanism adds about 30 grams to the weight of a standard X0 rear derailleur. A unique feature of the Type 2 system is that its Cage Lock technology allows you, with the push of a button, to lock the derailleur cage in an extended position. While it may not be a game changer, this is a nice feature that allows for easier-than-ever rear wheel installation. There's no need to worry if you accidentally leave the derailleur cage locked; it will return to normal operating position when you hit your first bump. Another benefit of the Cage Lock is that it makes chain installation a bit easier; you don't have to maintain a consistent pulling force on the cage while joining the...
$169 Go to
Competitive Cyclist
SRAM once again made its signature leap by creating the new Force group with a 'True 22' shifting system. Force now carries an 11-speed drivetrain that provides 22 useable and trim-free gears, combined with the functionality and beautiful aesthetics of SRAM's flagship Red group. We tip our hats to SRAM, as its engineers have successfully carried over the best attributes of its top-end Red group, at a price that's within reach of a greater number of cycling enthusiasts. For the new Force 22 groupset, the shifters were completely overhauled, now wearing the same hood and lever shape as the current Red 22/Ergo Dynamic Shifters. The new shifters also borrow the same durable, reliable internals that have made Red the preferred componentry choice for many pro tour teams. Force 22 hoods are now practically identical to Red's, aside from the stealthy gray-on-black graphic treatment. SRAM carried over the ErgoFit bodies and internals of its Red Ergo Dynamic Shifters, with the exception of them now being built with an 11th indent. In designing the shifters for Red, SRAM focused its research and development on perfecting their shape, texture, and materials. The new ErgoFit bodies are somewhat smaller in diameter when compared side-to-side with the original Force. This improves grip and finger wrap by allowing more room under the hood for a control- and comfort-boosting connection. The new shape offers a smooth transition from bar to hood and SRAM covered it with lightly padded, textured rubber to thwart fatigue and enhance grip. They also reshaped the hoods, increasing the size of the bulge up top for increased leverage and comfort when you're stretched out, putting extra pressure on the hoods. Because the internals carry over, or have been slightly modified to fit the new body, the Force 22 levers retain the crisp movement between gears SRAM mastered with the first-generation Red. The key to this is SRAM's ZeroLoss and DoubleTap technologies. DoubleTap technology allo...
$274 Go to
Competitive Cyclist